The Earl of Doncaster
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The Earl of Doncaster (A short history)

 

James Crofts, the first Earl of Doncaster was actually a Duke (a common thing in those days), in fact he held a double Dukedom (very rare).

 

He was also famous (or should I say infamous) as he was indeed the Duke of Monmouth. He was born on the 9th of April 1649 in Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and bought to England in 1663 where his name was legally changed to James Scott.

 

On the 14th of February 1663 he was 'created' with the following titles:

 

Duke of Monmouth
Earl of Doncaster
1st Baron Scott of Tynedale, Northumberland.


James Crofts - 1st Earl of Doncaster

On the 28th of March that same year was invested as a Knight, Order of the Garter (KG), and succeeded to the title 1st Lord Scott of Whitchester and Eskdale (Scotland) on 20 April 1663.

 

He was created 1st Duke of Buccleuch* (Scotland) on 20 April 1663, with special remainder to the heirs of his body who succeed to the Earldom of Buccleuch. He was created 1st Earl of Dalkeith (Scotland) on 20 April 1663. Before 1707 Scotland had it's own peerage system.

 

Apparently he was also Lord Lieutenant and Custos Rotulorum of Staffordshire (keeper of the rolls) from 16781680.

 

Why did he get all these tiles? - because he was (probably) the illegitimate son of King Charles II and his mistress Lucy Walter.

 

He was married off to the wealthy Anne (or maybe Anna) Scott (4th Countess of Buccleuch) daughter of Francis (2nd Earl of Buccleuch) and Lady Margaret Leslie, on 20 April 1663. The day of their marriage, they were made Duke and Duchess of Buccleuch.

 

His marriage to Anne Scott resulted in the birth of seven children:


  • Charles Scott, Earl of Doncaster (August 24, 1672 February 9, 1673/1674).
  • Sir James Scott, Earl of Dalkeith (May 23, 1674 March 14, 1705).
  • Lady Anne Scott (February 17, 1675 August 13, 1685).
  • Maj.-Gen. Sir Henry Scott, 1st Earl of Deloraine (1676 December 25, 1730).
  • Lord Francis Scott (1678 buried December 8, 1679).
  • Lady Isabella Scott (d. February 18, 1748).
  • Lady Charlotte Scott (1683, buried September 5, 1683).

 

Now, the eldest son Charles Scott was styled Earl of Doncaster because his father was a Duke, unfortunately he died a short time after his first birthday, so his brother Sir James Scott was styled as Earl of Doncaster between 1674 and 1685, and then after his father was executed was styled as Earl of Dalkeith between 1685 and 1705.

 

So it's  a very short history as it seems only 3 people held the title Earl of Doncaster between 1663 and 1685.

 

However, following an act of parliament in 1742, on the 23rd March 1743 the 2nd Duke of Buccleuch had the titles of Earl of Doncaster and Baron Scott of Tindal restored (by this time there was already an Earl of Monmouth so the Dukedom was a non-starter).

 

The current Earl of Doncaster, Richard Scott, besides being the 10th Duke of Buccleuch is also the Duke of Queensberry, Marquess of Dumfriesshire, Earl of Buccleuch, Earl of Dalkeith, Earl of Drumlanrig and Sanquhar, Viscount of Nith, Torthorwald and Ross, Lord Scott of Buccleuch, Lord Scott of Whitchester, Baron Scott of Tindall, and Lord Douglas of Kinmont, Midlebie and Dornock, and is also recognised as the Chief of the Name and Arms of Scott.

 

* Buccleuch pronounced Buck-lew.

 

This material was gathered from various sources and is believed to be accurate. Please feel free to Contact us.

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